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Dinosaur prints in Jura mountains

The footprints look like being the largest ever found and are causing much excitement in the scientific community and beyond.

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The Alps and the nearby Jura mountains have revealed some spectacular dinosaur footprints over the years.

5 years ago thousands of footprints were found in Switzerland when a motorway project began.  They included crocodiles and mammoths as well as dinosaurs. 

In France saurpod tracks were found in 2004 and two years later more were discovered in a nearby quarry.  Seems a few million years ago the animals liked the area.

The latest ones are reported to be 2 metres across and were found by two amateur palaentologists near the village of Plagne, to the west of Geneva.

The tracks are perfectly preserved and were made about 150 million years ago.

The prints are thought to be from a herbivorous Sauropod, probably a Diplodocus. The animal was 10 times heavier than an elephant measuring more than 25m long and weighing between 30 and 40 tonnes.

The French National Centre for Scientific Research has said they are the largest known dinosaur prints recorded.

It’s thought it could be one of the most significant finds ever made.

For more on this story see here.

In the summer on PlanetSKI we reported on dinosaur footprints found on a steep mountainside in Switzerland. 

But how on earth did they get there? See here.

Now the only problem we have here at PlanetSKI is trying to work out exactly where the latest dinosaur footprints were found.  The news wires we have seen say it is Plagne in the Jura mountains.  We have found that the village of Plagne is beneath the ski resort of La Plagne in the Alps, not the Jura.  Yet all the sources we have seen also say the prints were definitely found in the Jura. 

Other sources say they were found 60km to the west of Geneva and the Jura mountains are mainly to the east.

Perhaps the original story was written by a journalist who does doesn’t ski or know his Alps from his Jura. We are investigating!

And just in case you are wondering the word Jurassic, used to describe the geological period when dinoaurs roamed the earth, originates from the name Jura.

 

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