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Former IOC President Jacques Rogge Has Died

He led the International Olympic Committee from 2001 to 2013. He was 79. He was a keen supporter of the Winter Olympics and his first Games as President was the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. UPDATED

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His first task on entering office was to clear up the scandal of how the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics was awarded with allegations of bribery and corruption.

In 1998 members of the International Olympic Committee were accused of taking gifts from the Salt Lake Organising Committee during the bidding process.

The allegations led to the expulsion of several IOC members and the adoption of new rules.

Although nothing strictly illegal had been done it was felt that the acceptance of the gifts was morally questionable and tainted the image of the IOC.

Jaques Rogge also had to deal with the vexed issue of doping throughout his tenure in office.

The current IOC President, Thomas Bach, succeeded Rogge in 2013.

“First and foremost, Jacques loved sport and being with athletes – and he transmitted this passion to everyone who knew him,” said Thomas Bach.

“His joy in sport was infectious.

“He was an accomplished President, helping to modernise and transform the IOC.

“He will be remembered particularly for championing youth sport and for inaugurating the Youth Olympic Games.

“He was also a fierce proponent of clean sport, and fought tirelessly against the evils of doping.

“Since we were elected as IOC members together we shared a wonderful bond of friendship, and this continued until his last days, when the entire Olympic Movement and I could still benefit from his contribution, in particular on the Board of the Olympic Foundation for Culture and Heritage.

“The entire Olympic Movement will deeply mourn the loss of a great friend and a passionate fan of sport.”

The Olympic flag is being flown at half-mast at all IOC buildings for five days.

He leaves behind his wife, Anne and a son, daughter and two grandchildren.

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